Teaching at North American Universities (Examples)


THE UNIVERSITY OF LETHBRIDGE, ALBERTA, CANADA, FACULTY OF EDUCATION


Summer Session, 2011;  Course Outline for Educ 4310:

Comparative Studies of Education
in Developed and Third World Countries


Instructor: Prof. Dr. Reinhard Golz


e-mail: reinhard@golz.tk

http://classes.uleth.ca/ClsDsp?cls=201102educ4310a

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Objectives
:

Educational developments in all countries of the world are more and more influenced by the processes of globalization, societal transformation, and migration. These processes are bringing with them new social risks.
Teachers everywhere share a lot of the same dreams and fears, but there is little in common regarding pedagogical concepts and practices. There are no universal recipes for an international and intercultural pedagogy. However, educational transformations without critically constructive consideration of international developments seldom last. By comparing international education systems we can enhance awareness of global links.  When we learn about people who live outside our borders, we can learn a lot about ourselves too. Thus education in other countries, cultures, and societies is relevant to our own classroom experiences.
In this seminar we examine educational systems in selected developed and less developed countries. We are analysing and comparing their historical and current developments and experiences and thus gaining not only new insights into these societies, but also an improved understanding of our own society and our own educational practices.

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Main Topics:

- Functions, approaches, and concepts of comparative education;  challenges and perspectives of inter-cultural (multicultural) education in globalization contexts
- Historical and current developments and challenges of education in selected European countries, with special reference to processes of societal transformations
- Educational and multicultural developments in classic immigration countries (USA and Canada) in the past and today
- Tradition and Modernization of Schooling in East Asia – the examples of Japan and China
- Social and educational challenges and perspectives in developing countries (“Third World” Countries) (Ethiopia, South Africa et al.)
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Course Format and Assignments:


The seminar is a mixture of class discussions, presentations, group work and written argumentations:
40 % of the final grade will be based on a presentation and guided group discussion;
20 % will be for active participation;
40 % will be given for a test (quiz) containing aspects discussed in this course, and a short written argumentation
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Main and Further Readings:
(These books and other materials will be put “on Reserve” or provided by the instructor.)

[1] Mazurek, K., Winzer, M. (Eds.) (2006). Schooling Around the World. Debates, Challenges, and Practices. Boston (…): Pearson Education, Inc.
[2] Mazurek, K. Winzer, M.A., & Majorek, C. (Eds.) (1999). Education in a Global Society: A Comparative Perspective. Boston (…): Allyn and Bacon
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[3] Arnove, R.F. & Torres, C.A. (Eds.) (1999). Comparative Education (...). Lanham (…): Rowman & Littlefield Publishers 
[4] Banks, J.A. & Banks, Ch.A.McGee (Eds.) (2001). Handbook on Multicultural Education. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass Inc., A Wiley Company
[5] Borevskaya, N.E., Borisenkov, V.P. & Chu Syaoman (Eds.) (2007). Russia – China: Educational Reform (…). Moscow: Russian Academy of Education (russ. & engl.)
[6] Bray, M. (2003). Other Fields an Ours: Academic Discourse and the Nature of Compara-tive Education. In: Comparative Education in Teacher Training. Vol. 2/2003. Sofia, pp. 9-20
[7] Crossley, M. & Keith, W. (2004). Comparative and International Research in Education. (…) London / New York: Routledge Falmer
[8] Döbert, H. & Sroka, W. (2004). Features of Successful School Systems. [Canada, England, Finnland, France, Netherland, Sweden]. Münster (…): Waxmann
[9] Ellis, A.K. / Fouts, J.T. (1996 ): Handbook of Educational Terms and Applications. Princeton: Eye of Education
[10] Golz, R. (2001). A Comparison of Intercultural Education in Germany, Canada & Russia. In: Gumanizacija Obrazovanija. Moscow / Sochi, Nr. 1/2001, pp. 77-90
[11] Golz, R. (2003). European or National Education? K.D. Ušinskiy and Comparative Education. In: Comparative Education in Teacher Training. Vol. 2. Ed. Sofia, pp. 43-46 
[12] Golz, R. (Ed.) (2005). Internationalization, Cultural Difference and Migration (...). Münster: LIT 
[13] Gutek, G. L. (1997). Historical and Philosophical Foundations of Education. New Jersey: Prentice-Hall
[14] Kargerova, J. & Krejcova, V. (2001). The Romany Minority and their Education in the Czech Republic. In: Humanisierung der Bildung. Frankfurt a.M. (et al.): Lang, pp. 58-71
[15] Kivisto, P. (2002). Canada and Australia (...). In: Kivisto, P. Multiculturalism in a Global Society. Oxford/Malden: Blackwell Publishing, pp. 84-115 
[16] Kucha, R. (Ed.) (2004): European Integration through Education. Lublin: Maria Curie-Sklodowska University Press
[17] McNergney, R. F., & Herbert, J. M. (1998). Foundations of Education. Boston (u.a.): Allyn and Bacon
[18] Phillips, D. & Schweisfurth. M. (2006). Comparative and International Education. London: Continuum
[19] Salimova, K. & Dodde, N.L. (2000) (Eds.). International Handbook on History of Education. Orbita-M
[20] Wolhuter, C. (et al.) (2008). Comparative Education at Universities World Wide. Sofia: Bureau for Educational Services 

Further Materials – provided by the Instructor

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Main Criteria for the Evaluation:
(A complete version - compiled by K. Mazurek, R. Runté et al. - can be provided by the instructor)

1.) Criteria for Evaluation of Class Presentation and Guided Group Discussion:
- a clear, comprehensive, interesting, introduction to and specification of the topic;
- a logical, easy to follow, progression of steps in the development of the topic;
- proper closure bringing the presentation to a logical, balanced and plausible conclusion(s);
- clear evidence of content knowledge and good communication skills;
- an effective use of time, ability to hold classmates’ interests in the presentation, generation of fruitful      discussions, appropriate use of teaching aids, good questioning techniques.

2.) Criteria for Active Class Participation:

- a well prepared attendance:  having completed assigned readings, reviewed previous lessons,  and having     points to bring to class discussions;
- availing classmates of your ideas, insights, and opinions;  being thoughtful and reflective in the course of     class discussions;  positively affecting class dynamics;
- no unexcused absences.

3.) Criteria for Evaluation of Written Work:
- a demonstration of a comprehensive grasp of the subject matter, including an in-depth understanding of     the relevant concepts, theories, and issues;
- an awareness of differing viewpoints and a rigorous assessment of these undertaken where relevant;     critical thinking in the analysis, synthesis and evaluation of relevant information;
- thoughtful statements of position; logical arguments, well structured and build to a consistent conclusion.


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UNIVERSITY OF LETHBRIDGE, ALBERTA, CANADA
FACULTY OF EDUCATION
SUMMER SESSION I,  2011


COURSE OUTLINE for EDUC 4391:
CHILD-CENTRED EDUCATION - PAST AND PRESENT

Instructor: Prof.  Dr. Reinhard Golz

e-mail: reinhard@golz.tk

http://classes.uleth.ca/ClsDsp?cls=201102educ4391a

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Objectives:

This course examines the historical roots, international origins, foundational premises, pedagogical practices, and contemporary impacts of ‘child-centered’ education. An appreciation of the scope and significance of ‘child-centered’ education will be developed through examination of selected education movements. These include: Progressive Education, alternative and innovative education, and their manifestations in different types of schooling established by Dewey, Montessori, Steiner, Korczak, Freinet, Malaguzzi, and others.
Understanding and drawing upon the varieties of ‘child-centered’ education facilitates a professional educator’s ability to translate curriculum content and objectives into meaningful learning activities, and to create environments that are conducive to student learning.  In this course you will enhance your knowledge of innovative and alternative educational theories and practices in the past and present. 
The impact of ‘child-centered’ education upon contemporary schooling is quite dramatic.  Certainly, at the early childhood and elementary school levels, the influence of its philosophies and practices is evident.  Furthermore - in Canada, and internationally - increasing numbers of pedagogues are working in growing number of alternative public and separate school programs, private schools, and charter schools.  Many of these programs and schools herald themselves as ‘innovative’ and explicitly oriented toward a ‘child-centered’ pedagogy.  Accordingly, an understanding of this movement’s historical roots, premises, different manifestations, and current practices is an important component of a teacher’s professional knowledge. 

Main Topics:
- Selected forerunners of the “Child-centred Education”: Comenius, Rousseau, et al.
- Progressive Education” in North America; the Project Method  (Dewey et al.)
- “New Education” (Reform Pedagogy) in Europe: Key´s individualistic education; Montessori's “Help me to do it by myself!”;  Malaguzzi's “The Hundred Languages of Children”;   Freinet’s “par la vie - pour la vie - par le travail”; Steiner's Waldorf education and anthroposophy;  Neill’s antiauthoritarian (free) education;  Makarenko’s collective education;  Korczak´s declaration of Children´s Rights
- Comparisons of the strengths and limitations of historical and contemporary child-centered educational concepts and practices
- Applying these insights to a critical analysis and understanding of alternative education programs in Canada

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Course Format and Assignments:
The seminar is a mixture of class discussions, presentations, and group work:
40 % of the final grade will be based on a presentation and guided group discussion
20 % will be for active participation
40% will be given for a test (quiz) containing aspects discussed in this course and a short written argumentation

_________________________

Readings:
(These books will be put “on Reserve” or provided by the instructor)

[1] Acker, V. (2007).  The French Educator Célestin Freinet (1896-1966). Verlag: Lexington
[2] Alberta Learning; Special Programs Branch (Ed.) (2005): Alternative Programs Handbook
[3] Boumard, P. (2004). Janusz Korczak and Celestin Freinet (…). In: Kucha, R. (Ed.). European Integration Through Education. Lublin: Maria-Sklodowska University Press
[4] Callan, E. (1990). John Dewey and the Two Faces of Progressive Education. In: Titley, B. (Ed.) Canadian Education (…) Calgary: Detselig
[5] Carnie, F. (2003). Alternative Approaches to Education. London: Routledge 
[6] Dewey, J. (1963). Experience and Education. New York. Collier Books 
[7] Dewey, J. (1990). The School and Society and The Child and the Curriculum. Chicago and London: The University of Chicago Press
[8] Gutek, G.L. (1997). Historical and Philosophical Foundations of Education. New Jersey: Prentice-Hall Inc. [Chapters on Comenius, Rousseau, Dewey, Montessori et al.]
[9] Korczak, J. (1992). When I Am Little Again and The Child's Right To Respect. Lanham, New York, London: University Press of America
[10] Neill, A.S. (1998). Summerhill School: A New View of Childhood. St Martin's: Griffin
[11] Oksenberg Rorty, A. (Ed.) (2001). Philosophers on Education. London and New York: Routledge [with texts on Rousseau, Dewey et al.]
[12] Petrash, J. (2003). Understanding Waldorf Education (…). Floris Books
[13] Röhrs, H., & Lenhart, V. (Eds.) (1995). Progressive Education Across the Continents. Frankfurt a.M. (et al.): Peter Lang
[14] Wurm, J. (2005). Working in the Reggio Way (…). Redleaf

[15] Other materials (videos; internet sources, copies etc.) will be put “on Reserve“ or provided by the instructor

Main Criteria for the Evaluation:
(A complete version - compiled by K. Mazurek and R. Runté et al. - can be provided by the instructor)

1.) Criteria for Evaluation of Class Presentation and Guided Group Discussion:
- a clear, comprehensive, interesting, introduction to and specification of the topic;
- a logical, easy to follow, progression of steps in the development of the topic;
- proper closure bringing the presentation to a logical, balanced and plausible conclusion(s);
- clear evidence of content knowledge and good communication skills;
- an effective use of time, ability to hold classmates’ interests in the presentation, generation of     fruitful     discussions, appropriate use of teaching aids, good questioning techniques.

2.) Criteria for Active Class Participation:
- a well prepared attendance:  having completed assigned readings, reviewed previous lessons,  and     having points to bring to class discussions;
- availing classmates of your ideas, insights, and opinions;  being thoughtful and reflective in the     course of class discussions;  positively affecting class dynamics;
- no unexcused absences.

3.) Criteria for Evaluation of Written Work:

- a demonstration of a comprehensive grasp of the subject matter, the relevant concepts and issues;
- an awareness of differing viewpoints and a rigorous assessment of these undertaken where     relevant;   
- critical thinking in the analysis, synthesis and evaluation of relevant information;
- thoughtful statements of position,  logically structured arguments build to a consistent conclusion.

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